North Carolina Schnoodles  

                           Premier breeder of beautiful family friendly schnoodle puppies

Male or Female ?


Female and Male Dogs Both Make Good Pets
Reasons for spaying and neutering in addition to pet over population


There are some common misconceptions concerning male & female dogs.  Most of the characteristic noted are based on dogs that  have not been spayed or neutered and are generalities. Meaning that altered male or female dogs will not typically behave as noted. This information also validates the advantages of spaying and neutering your dog which we require.  In my opinion female dogs are generally a bit smarter than the male dogs. Our female dogs are just as affectionate as our males.  I hope this page will help you with your decision on adopting a male or female pup.

From AKC website:

"In general, there is no significant difference in temperament between male and female dogs. If you are getting a dog for a pet, you will want to have your dog spayed or neutered, which will eliminate most minor differences anyway.
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Generalizations: Unaltered Male & Female Dogs


In some ways, choosing between male and female dogs is a matter of personal preference. However, there are some characteristics which are common in bitches and other characteristics which are common in male dogs. It is important to evaluate these characteristics and determine which sex would fit in best with your home situation. Additionally, choosing between male and female dogs is important if you already have another bitch or male dog and are choosing an additional dog. This article will list a few characteristics of bitches, a few characteristics of male dogs, and how to choose between male and female dogs when considering a second or third dog.




The following characteristics often apply to bitches:

1. More Independent - Bitches tend to want to be in control of the entire situation. They may come to their owner when they are seeking affection but will often move away when they have had enough.

2. Can Be Stubborn - In many packs, a bitch is typically the Alpha. Female dogs crave more control of situations and are quick to respond to perceived challenges with fierceness.

3.Territorial - Un-Spayed Female dogs mark in the same way male dogs do.

4. Changes in Mood or Behavior - It is also important to note that if you do not spay your bitch, she will come into heat at approximately one year of age and approximately every six months thereafter. During this time, there will be some bleeding as well as a change in mood or behavior.


The following characteristics often apply to male dogs:

1. Affectionate - Male dogs are typically more affectionate than bitches. They tend to crave attention from their owners more than bitches and as a result, display more affectionate behaviors.

2. Exuberant - A male dog is also more likely to be fun-loving and outgoing throughout his lifetime than a bitch. While a bitch tends to become more reserved as she ages, a male dog maintains a more puppy-like exuberance throughout his lifetime.

3. Food-Motivated - Males are often very motivated by food. This food motivation can make training extremely easy as treats can be used to lure and reward a dog to display desired behaviors.

4. Attentive - While bitches tend to be more independent, males tend to be more focused on their human companions. They want to always be close to the human and are very eager to please.

5. Aggressive Behaviors - It is also important to note that intact males may display aggressive behaviors toward other males or exhibit marking behaviors. Additionally, intact males should be kept away from females in heat unless a breeding is planned.




Summary:
Selecting a male or female dog is largely a matter of personal preference. The above characteristics are generalizations, and it is certainly possible to purchase or adopt a female puppy who displays male characteristics or a male puppy who displays the typical female characteristics. Additionally, bitches that are spayed and dogs that are neutered often do not have the gender-specific problems associated with their sex and it eliminates coming into heat  and most marking behaviors.


Adding an additional dog to the family :

Dog owners who are adding an additional dog to their home should carefully consider the ramifications of adding a dog of either sex. This is important because the makeup of the existing pack may be more accepting to either a male or a female dog. The following are general tips for selecting the gender of a second dog:

 1. If you already have a male or a female, a dog of the opposite sex is generally the best choice. Dogs of the same sex are more likely to fight than dogs of the opposite sex.

 2. If you already have a male dog, he is likely to be more accepting of a female and you are likely to have fewer dominance issues if you add a female to the pack. However, if you opt to add another male to the pack, they can peacefully co-exist and may even become friends. It is important to closely monitor their interactions early on to ensure aggressive behaviors do not become common.

3. If you already have a female dog, she is likely to be more accepting of a male. Most males tend to be submissive. If he does not challenge your resident female, she is not likely to have a reason to fight with him. Adding a female dog to the pack, however, may result in complications. The worst combination of dogs is two bitches because they are more likely to fight than a male and a female or two males. However, many dog owners have two or more bitches that live together without problems. As long as there is an established Alpha and the other bitches know their place in the pack, there will not be dominance struggles often, although they may still occur.


* http://www.howtodothings.com/pets-and-animals/a4104-how-to-choose-between-male-and-female-dogs.html

 

Male vs. Female
The age old dilemma of which is better

Many people believe that female dogs make better pets...female preference seems to be ingrained in these people. Most calls for pet dogs have people wanting a 'sweet girl'. They don't think females display alpha behaviors like 'marking' and/or 'humping'. They believe that they are more docile and attentive and do not participate in fighting over dominance.

Well folks, this is not true and they don't call them a 'bitch' for nothing!

In the dog pack makeup, females usually rule the roost, determine pecking order, and who compete to maintain and/or alter that order. The females are, as a result, more independent, stubborn, and territorial than their male counterparts. The females are much more intent upon exercising their dominance by participating in alpha behaviors such as 'humping'. There IS a reason people utilize the technical dog term of 'bitch' in a negative way-and it refers directly to the behaviors exhibited by the females of the dog world. Most fights will usually break out between 2 females. Males, on the other hand, are usually more affectionate, exuberant, attentive, and more demanding of attention. They are very attached to their people. They also tend to be more steadfast, reliable, and less moody. They are more outgoing, more accepting of other pets, and take quicker to children. Most boys are easily motivated by food (how true!!) and praise, and so eager to please that training is easy. However, males can be more easily distracted during training, as males like to play so often. And no matter what age, he is more likely to act silly and more puppy-like, always wanting to play games. Boys are fun-loving until the day they die. Females tend to be more reserved or dignified as they age. Witness the human equivalent of the twinkling eyed Grandpa still playing catch at age 70, while Grandma quietly observes from the porch.

Neutered males rarely exhibit secondary sexual behavior such as 'humping', or 'marking' and lifting of legs. Once the testosterone levels recede after neutering, most of these behaviors (if they ever existed) will disappear. Boys who were neutered early (by 5 months of age) usually don't ever raise their leg to urinate.

While the female will usually come to you for attention, when she's had enough, she will move away. While boys are always waiting for your attention and near at hand. Females are usually less distracted during training, as she is more eager to get it over with, and get back to her comfy spot on the couch. The female is less likely to wage a dominance battle with YOU, but she can be cunning and resourceful in getting her own way. She is much more prone to mood swings. One day she may be sweet and affectionate-the next day reserved and withdrawn or even grumpy. The female also has periods of being 'in heat' unless she is spayed.

Seasonal heats can be a three week long hassle not just for the female, but you and every male dog in the neighborhood. Did we mention that the seasonal heats happen TWICE a year?

If you are not breeding, you'd be best off to have her spayed since during this time she can leave a bloody discharge on carpets, couches, or anywhere she goes. She will be particularly moody and emotional during this time. A walk outside during this period can become hazardous if male dogs are in the vicinity, and she will leave a 'scent' for wandering intact males to follow right to your yard, where they will hang out, and 'wait' for days.

Research has also proven that a female NOT bred during a heat cycle stays in a flux of estrogen level which may give us the reason as to why females are more moody than males.

Males generally cost 1/2 the price to have neutered as a female does to be spayed.

* http://pocketpuppy.com/maleVSfemale.asp
 

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